Saturday, November 5, 2016

The Sparrow's Mill

Expect lines on a Saturday night, but table turnover is a decent time. I'm actually not a big fan of KFC (korean fried chicken) and actual KFC because it's all super unhealthy and not good for the skin...but I guess once in a while it's ok. They only had around 5 types of sizes and weren't that big either, but they happy to replenish (I've been to places in Sydney where they don't give free refills....)

Snow cheese chicken (half)-$18

This was interesting, kind of like cheese powder flavouring, or like those mac and cheese pasta, but crunchy and deep fried. Kind of like cheese twisties, but not as artificial. Chicken well cooked but could be more moist. Probably the most flavourful out of the other chickens.

Spring onion chicken (half)-$18

I was expecting this to be more fragrant with the spring onion. Tbh, don't think the spring onion did much, probably just easier to order normal deep fried chicken.

Soy sauce chicken (half)-$18

I was expecting this to more flavourful, maybe I got the massive rib cage bone so didn't have as much meet. Thought this was average since you don't get the crunch compared to the other chickens.

Wagyu beef and mushroom hot pot-$42

Decent serving of meat and mushroom. Meat was tender and had a good amount of flavour without being too salty. 

Sweet potato noodles-$16

Don't know the authentic name...It wasn't a massive portion and only mushroom and veggies in this. The noodles had a bit more of a chewier/stickier texture compared to other ones I've had. Less oily which is a plus.

sides

I'll admit I go to Korean places to eat for the sides. They were pretty small and not that much variety, but I still ended up getting some refills. I would say this place is alright for Korean food, but there are better places in Sydney.

outside

kitchen
The Sparrow's Mill Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

1 comment:

  1. The sweet potato noodles are called japchae! I like them but yeah, unfortunately the Koreans at my church used to make it really oily, so I guess that's the authentic way of cooking it.

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